The red rocky walls – Kings Canyon it is!

Three days before the tour:

“Is it worth the amount I am spending?” I asked two of my colleagues.

One of my colleagues answered, “I did not visit Kings Canyon when I visited Ayers Rock”. I wondered why, but chose to ignore it.

The French colleague of mine in his French accent said, “You should visit Kings Canyon, and it is very beautiful. And I drove from Ayers Rock”.

With conflicting thoughts, I decided to spend my last savings on the experience and finally booked my day tour to Kings Canyon with AAT Kings, blaming whoever said it is worth spending the money on experience rather than materialistic things! :/

Previous night of the tour:

AAT Kings had emailed me the detailed itinerary. The pick-up time from my hotel (Outback pioneer, which is a really cool place to stay at btw!) was at 4:50 AM. I set up two alarms – one for 4:00 AM and the other for 4:10 AM, exactly calculating every minute between 4:10 AM to 4:50 AM. Am all organised and am the best, thinking to myself, I went to bed.

On the day of the tour:

I switched my first alarm off happily thinking about the extra 10 minutes I had, for my sleep. I woke up 2 minutes later and checked my phone, only to find out that it was 4:46 AM and that my bus was parked outside waiting for me to be picked up. I panicked – Oh my God! How did this happen? I broke any girl’s record (and I think I should be awarded for this!!) and got ready in flat 8 minutes – okay I agree, it’s exaggeration – in 12 flat minutes (Wooohooo!).

The bus driver gave me a stressed out look (Come on dude! It’s just 4:58 AM) as I ran towards the bus. Clumsily getting into the bus and surpassing all the eyes staring at me in anger (some were picked up at 4:00 AM :P), I settled down on a two seater with my tripod and my huge heavy backpack (I don’t have a slightest idea what’s in my backpack – all I use is my wallet). After about 2 minutes, finally we started our drive to Kings Canyon.

Kings Canyon is part of the Watarrka National Park in the Northern Territory of Australia. It comprises of massive 100 meters sandstone walls and lush palm trees. The drive is approximately 3 hours’ from Ayers Rock.

Just before reaching the base of Kings Canyon, our driver gave us a heads up of what to expect during the day. He briefed us about the two famous walks – one being the short 2 km return walk at the base of the Canyon (Aah, 2 km walk? That’s for kids, I thought! :/) and the other being the most challenged 6 kms return RIM walk, with 500+ rocky steps and a path at the top around the Canyon.

32 of us decided to do the RIM walk and signed our health declaration forms. I decided to leave my tripod in the bus (which was a pretty good idea) and carried my backpack with two mini water bottles and my M&Ms:). The walk started at approximately 9 AM. At the base, I agree, it did look very scary, but I had to do it, no chance I would have backed out (stubborn huh!). The first 200 steps, I think, were the hardest. I maintained my slow pace and took lots of pictures along the way.

We did have an option to return to the bus anytime between the first 200 steps. All 32 of us were determined to complete the RIM walk and decided to climb the rest 300 steps:). Some rocks were more difficult to climb than the others. Step by step and one rock at a time, all of us made it to the top! Once we reached the top of the Canyon, we forgot how strenuous the climb was and started enjoying the spectacular views of the gorge below.

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The red rock structures with patches of green palm trees were something to die for. The sandstone walls were a delight for the photographers with the bright beautiful colors. I have close to 300 pictures of just the sandstone walls:).

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In approx. 4 hours, just before the lunch, we had completed the RIM walk. At the end of the walk, I had a smile and a satisfaction of climbing up one of the prominent landmarks of Australia. I am thankful to my French colleague who convinced me to do this day tour.

© 2015 Raksha Nagaraj All Rights Reserved. Reproduction, or re-transmission, in whole, or in part, or in any manner, without prior written consent of the author, is in violation of the copyright law.

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Comments

17 comments on “The red rocky walls – Kings Canyon it is!”
  1. Akshata says:

    Nice Write up Raksha… You made me feel a part of this trip as well 😀

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks Akshata! Glad you liked it 😁

      Like

  2. Revie Anne Concepcion says:

    Nice blog Raksha!!! … Love the picture as well…
    I feel more encouraged to pursue my Uluru trip….

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks a lot Revie! Really appreciate it 🙂

      Like

  3. Milena Popovac says:

    Dear Raksha, I have really enjoyed reading your blog. You’ve got such an amazing sense of humor

    Looking forward to hear more from you

    With love

    Milena

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Dear Milena, I am so very happy that you enjoyed my blog! You have always been very kind and sweet to me. Thank you! Love, Raksha

      Like

  4. SAM says:

    An IT professional travel experience blogging is good with no Over thinking Narration .
    Experience narrated lfate with no mountian surprise and rocking expression .
    Does King Canyon name has any history of name origin?
    I appreciate your energy in climbing 300 rocks . You proved the your passion “”who breathes travel”

    Keep rocking your travel experience and TAKE us to the place you been and MAKE us to feel being there in your blogs.

    The blog title is good , I suggest a title like “Queen at Kings Canyon”. 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you so much Sai! I will definitely remember your tips for the next blog I am writing 🙂 🙂

      Like

  5. Kayleen says:

    Thank you for sharing your blog, it was lovely to read and to look at the pictures!
    I definitely need to get my act together and visit central Australia

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thanks a lot! Yes, Central Australia is beautiful. 🙂

      Like

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